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Carpentier was still considered important enough to earn a full-page color portrait in the Police Gazette's "Gallery of Champions" a couple of decades after his retirement.

This portrait of Carpentier in full 1920's matinee-idol mode appeared inside the program for "Femmes et Sports.""M. Georges Carpentier is clothed and shirted, on stage and on the street, by Lanvin; his shoes are by Perugia; his hats by Sools; his…

After his retirement from the ring in late 1926, Carpentier embarked on a career as a song-and-dance man, appearing on stages in France, England, Spain and across the United States. The first show in which he appeared was the most elaborate and…

Given that this issue of the Police Gazette appeared in December 1916, less than a week after the end of the Battle of Verdun (in which Carpentier fought), its claim that Tex Rickard was arranging a title bout between Carpentier and Jess Willard…

Carpentier knocked out Australian heavyweight George Cook in London, on January 12, 1922. This postcard is from the "Famous Boxers" series produced by Beagles' Postcards of London.

Carpentier knocked out Australian heavyweight George Cook in London, on January 12, 1922. This postcard is from the "Famous Boxers" series produced by Beagles' Postcards of London.

This French postcard shows a figure that clearly represents the Kaiser, knocked out by a figure in tri-color trunks that appears to represent or at least suggest Carpentier. The caption reads “ Knocked out for ten centuries!”

“Georges Carpentier […] now an aviator in French Aerial Corps. Heavy-wt. Champion of Europe. Since he started at the age of thirteen, his career has been one round of sensation. His last victory was at the expense of Gunboat Smith. Was matched…

The caption reads: “Joinville: National Military Academy of Physical Education. Instruction Center: Boxing Demonstration by G. Carpentier (instructor).” Carpentier never saw active duty again after Verdun. He was on the staff at Joinville from…

“Carpentier signing agreement. Carpentier signed articles to box Young Ahearn, Aug, 17, but was freed from his contract in order to serve his country. At the farewell dinner, he signed a fresh agreement with Mr. Bottomley to box Ahearn as soon as…

The caption reads: “The 1914-1915 Campaign. The boxing champion Carpentier has become a pilot.”

This card, showing “Bill Kaiser” being knocked out by Georges Carpentier, clearly demonstrates just how iconic and beloved a figure Carpentier had become, in England as well as in France, at the time of World War I.

From the Carpentier-Wells rematch, a first-round KO (December 8, 1913, Covent Garden). This card is from the "Famous Knock-Outs" series produced by "The Rocket" magazine.

Like Carpentier, Wells cultivated a smiling, clean-cut, "gentlemanly" image.

By defeating Bombardier Billy Wells, the nineteen year-old Carpentier became the heavyweight champion of Europe.

By defeating Bombardier Billy Wells, the nineteen year-old Carpentier became the heavyweight champion of Europe.

“The Champion of England is Knocked Out: in the second round, to the enthusiastic acclamations of the crowd.”

“The Champion of France Carpentier in the Ring with Jim Sullivan: The start of the first round, in Monte-Carlo.”

“Georges Carpentier After His Victory”/Carpentier's defeat of Jim Sullivan earned him, at age eighteen, the middleweight championship of Europe. The bout took place on February 29, 1912, in Monte Carlo.

“Gunboat Smith Knocked Out: In the fourth round, Georges Carpentier landed a thunderous hook to Smith’s jaw, which sent the American to the canvas unconscious. He tired to get up on the count of nine, but couldn’t manage it. It was at that…

“The Dastardly Blow is Landed: After measuring the distance with his left, Gunboat Smith, in a methodical and cowardly fashion, aimed and unleashed a ferocious right, hitting Carpentier between the back of the neck and the carotid artery, while…

“An Attack by Carpentier: Our champion Carpentier was exceptionally courageous, constantly attacking, setting the pace and the style of the fight and going after his opponent how he wanted and when he wanted, with truly catlike moves.”

“The Cowardly Aggression of Gunboat Smith: Carried away by the momentum of an attack slipped by Gunboat Smith, Carpentier falls on his hands. The American, who had had his back turned, comes back at him as the Frenchman observes his position…

“An Attack by Gunboat Smith: You can see in this photo how timidly, how fearfully Gunboat Smith attacked when, by chance, he wasn’t throwing illegal punches. But Carpentier paid little attention to this exaggerated defense; you can see him…

“Gunboat Smith Has Just Landed the blow that Disqualified Him: Gunboat Smith, who was knocked out by Carpentier in the fourth round and only escaped being counted out due to the incompetence of the referee and the time-keeper, was disqualified in…

“The Enthusiasm of the British for Carpentier: During his entire stay in London, Carpentier was given a king’s welcome. Crowds stood for hours in front of the Metropole Hotel in the hope of being able to catch a glimpse of him. As soon as he…

“Carpentier’s Triumphal Arrival in London: No champion has ever received a warmer welcome than Carpentier in London. When he stepped off the train, a crowd of more than 1,000 people were waiting to cheer him. The man who would decisively defeat…

This press photo shows Carpentier (dead center of photo, in suit and tie, with fist aloft) arriving at Charing Cross Station for his fight (for the real title of Heavyweight Champion of Europe and the imaginary one of “White Heavyweight Champion of…

“Battling Siki. The present Light-heavyweight Champion of the World, who so sensationally defeated Georges Carpentier at Paris, on September 24th."

This postcard, with facsimile signature, was produced by the prolific Dix postcard company (Paris).

“Battling Siki, heavyweight boxing champion of France.” This card would have been tucked inside the wrapper of a chocolate bar. It is interesting to note that Siki is identified here as the heavyweight champion of France, when in fact he was also…

“The Siki-Carpentier fight. A sensational contest at Paris on 24th which Georges Carpentier was knocked out in the sixth round.” This card is from the "Famous Knock-Outs" series, produced by "The Rocket" magazine (British).

From the "Famous Boxers" series of postcards produced by J, Beagles & Co. (London). Beagles was know for their postcards of members of the royal family, actresses and other celebrities, in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. For…

“Conqueror of Carpentier.” It is interesting to note that Siki is identified here neither as the light-heavyweight champion of the world nor the first African-born world champion in any sport but rather as the man who "conquered" Carpentier.

“The Fighting Frenchman.” The implication seems to be there that there were no others.

“Carpentier, lifeless, his face hidden by a towel, is carried back to the locker room.” The man who had entered the ring applauded as a beloved hero just thirty minutes earlier leaves it amidst the jeers of a scornful crowd.

“Carpentier, after the incident in the sixth round, is pushed and pulled back to his corner.”

“Third Round: Carpentier is taken down by a left hook. (Bernstein holds Siki back.)”

“Third Round: Siki, stunned, takes a knee (Bernstein holds Carpentier back).”

“In the second round, Carpentier attacks again and Siki continues to take care to protect himself.”

“The Dramatic Conclusion of the Carpentier-Siki Boxing Match at the Buffalo Velodrome: One minute into the sixth round. Carpentier, who has been unsteady for two rounds, collapses on the canvas, after a series of violent blows from the Senegalese,…

Carpentier defeated the great Ted "Kid" Lewis in a spectacular first-round knockout on May 11, 1922, in London. The fight was a defense of Carpentier's titles as light-heavyweight champion of the world and heavyweight champion of Europe, both of…

This card was released on April 1, 1922, just a little more than a month before Carpentier KO’d the great Ted "Kid" Lewis in the first round on May 11, in London. The fight was a defense of Carpentier's titles as light-heavyweight champion of the…

In August 1945, some twenty-four years after the fact, the Carpentier-Dempsey fight was still of enough importance to warrant a full article, announced on the cover of the magazine no less.

Note the people lined up for tickets in the image at bottom right.
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